U.S. Bank Kirkland Concours d’Elegance at LeMay – America’s Car Museum

The Tempo VI racing boat with the Concours show field and the LeMay - America's Car Museum, in the background.
The weather on Sunday for the U.S. Bank Kirkland Concours d’Elegance in Tacoma was almost perfect, with just a few raindrops falling at one point. On one side of the show field was a stunning display of racing hydroplane boats, propped up on angles so you could see right into their cockpits. The show field had an excellent variety of cars, from the oldest to the newest, and from the most mundane to the most outrageous. If you wanted to see an important historic artifact, it doesn’t get much better then the oldest known Ferrari in existence, the red 1947 Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa owned by Jim Clark.
caption – The Best of Show winner 1933 V-16 Marmon with screen-star Ed Herrmann standing on the stage. Ed was the Concours emcee, and he is standing with Keith Martin of Sports Car Market magazine. Keith interviewed car owners and provided color commentary during the awards ceremony.
The Best of Show winner 1933 V-16 Marmon with screen-star Ed Herrmann standing on the stage. Ed was the Concours emcee, and he is standing with Keith Martin of Sports Car Market magazine. Keith interviewed car owners and provided color commentary during the awards ceremony.

It was certainly difficult to choose a best of show winner from among the competition, but the final choice seemed fitting. The Best of Show was awarded to the 1933 Marmon V-16 Convertible Coupe owned by Aaron Weiss of San Marino, California. Its rare to ever see a 16 cylinder Marmon, as very few were ever made. The timing of trying to sell a large powerful car in the depths of the great depression was not a recipe for success for an automobile company. And the winner here was the very desirable and rare convertible coupe, and in stunning black.

1928 Auburn boattailed speedster owned by Karen Hutchinson

An elegant classic car on display was the 1928 Auburn Speedster owned by Karen Hutchinson. Karen’s husband explained to me that the car had been a birthday present from him to Karen. I had to wonder if this was one of those presents that was really for the ‘two of them’? He did explain that it was Karen’s idea to include the fine green stripe to highlight the styling of the red and maroon car. A very smart touch!

One treasure of the parking lot, the lovely and original Triumph TR4A driven almost 300 miles to the event.

Sometimes the cars in the parking lot are as interesting as the classics on the field. My 11 year old son Cameron spied and fell in love with an original Triumph TR4A, resplendent in faded white paint with plenty of stone chips and bits of dirt and rust. In the car world, we call this a ‘rich patina’. Upon close inspection, it had a rare factory hardtop and the owner had added a row of additional gauges below the dash. This was a real driver’s car! The cars owner explained that he had owned the car since it was only five years old. He looked at little bit like Santa Claus with his full beard, and explained to us that he had driven the Triumph (about a 50 year old car) almost 300 miles from his home in Eugene, Oregon. At the end of the show, we said our goodbyes in the parking lot. He said that he had to get back on the road, so he could be on the job to deliver his mail route on Monday!